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More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4630 01/29/07 04:51 PM
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Don Osell Offline OP
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About one year ago on these pages we told a story under the title: "What Happened to Emily Rose." Some readers may remember but to those of you new--or who need their memories primed--a brief reprise is in order. The story revolved around a strange happening that occured in a remote shack north on Rush River in an area known The Devil's Jump-Off, or to others as The End of the World. Without going into extensive review, the thrust of the story is as follows. Dr. Jaques Duclos, a well-known physician in Henderson in the 1920s and 30s was at his camp on the confluence of the Minnesota and Rush rivers. It was an escape-retreat for the colorful Henderson doctor who loved the outdoors and river, in particular. In the middle of the night he was awoken by a loud knocking on his cabin door. A tall bearded stranger, unknown to the doctor and speaking in a heavy German accent, excitedly told him his daughter was ill and would he come and attend to her. He explained that they lived in a shack on Rush River some 10 miles west of Doc's cabin. Duclos hurriedly dressed and, on foot, followed the man upstream along the banks of the Rush. Arriving at the shack--in the area he recognized as Devil's Jump-off--he found the young girl feverish and hallucinating. Throughout the night he attempted to bring down the girl's fever with little success. "We might be losing her," he whispered to the father. "I wish we had a priest or a minister here." Without further word the father left the shack and returned an hour later with another man, also a stranger to Duclos. The new arrival began a series on incantations which had little or no meaning to the learned Doctor. In due time the girl's fever broke and she rested comfortably. Duclos left the shack and in the course of the busy months that followed pushed the incident to the back of his mind. Late that fall he made a hiking trip back to the shack in the company of a young neighbor boy, Fritz Kelm. The bearded man was there and when Duclos inquired about the health of his daughter, he denied anyone had ever been there with him. In the events that followed the mystery only deepened and the story seemed to end when the man--he had identified himself as August Heidelberg, a native of Vienna, Austria--left to return to Europe. End of the story.

Or was it?

New information has come to light in the form of a journal kept by the Herrmann sisters, Minerva and Loretta. The Herrmann family was well known in Henderson. The father, Lay, or Leopold, lived on North Fifth Street, two blocks north of Main where for years he operated a sawmill. His son, Leo, known as "Booney," was an electrician. Minerva and Loretta were well educated school teachers who resided in the Chicago area. The sisters, both spinsters, had a passion for travel. They spent their summer vacations traveling somewhere in the country, or in the world, for that fact. Well before world traveling was fashionable the Herrmann sisters were comfortably trotting the globe. In the summer of 1934 they arranged an extensive trip through central Europe.

And they kept a journal of their trip; a journal that has only recently resurfaced.

It is here that our story of "What Happened to Emily Rose," takes an expected turn. As so often happens...a story that we thought had ended...had only begun.

In the days ahead we will share with you the twists and turns of this unlikely story. We may even be able to answer, "What indeed did happened to Emily Rose."

[To be continued]... --Don Osell

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4631 01/29/07 05:04 PM
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Jeff Steinborn Online Content
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Awesome! Can't wait.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4632 01/29/07 06:04 PM
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I'm excited to hear more!

I never did see the movie, was it good?

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4633 01/31/07 12:06 AM
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Part 2--"More about what happened to Emily Rose."
In December of 1933, the Hermann sisters, Loretta and Minerva, prepared to leave their home and teaching jobs in Chicago and travel back to Henderson for the Christmas holidays. From the train station in downtown Chicago they departed on the C&NW RR for Minneapolis. From there they caught the first train south to Henderson. Depot agent Bill Schumacher meet them as they stepped onto the platform in East Henderson. "Welcome home, ladies, how was the trip?" Loretta, the more extroverted of the two, was quick to answer. "You should see the snow on the tracks between Chicago and Minneapolis...we had to stop twice for crews to clear the tracks." Schumacher answered, "Yes, I've been getting teletype messages. As you can see, we only have maybe a foot of snow here." He continued: "The trains about 15 minutes late and I suspect George Berla knows that but he's be here shortly. Come on inside and warm up." Berla operated the livery service in Henderson and besides handling freight to and from the depot he also provided a taxi service for passengers. Inside the depot the potbellied stove was near red hot and some of the depot neighbors were congregated, partly to stay warm but mostly to pick up news from arriving passengers. "Well, if it isn't the Herrmann sisters," one of them said, "Home for Christmas, I suppose...your brother, Booney, told me you were expected." Small talk ensued for the next few minutes when agent Schumacher interupted..."I see Berlas livery truck pulling in now. I'll put your luggage in the back and George will make room for you up front...by the heater. I tell you that heater is working overtime today."

On the short trip to town Berla filled the sisters in on the latest news in town. "Christmas lights are up on Main Street...sure is pretty...you father's been right busy at the sawmill...partly cuttng stove wood...but there's some new houses going up, too...Elmer Tolf, the Swede carpenter, is working overtime..." and so it continued all the way to town where Berla dropped the sisters off at the Herrmann house on North Fifth.

It was an eventful Christmas vacation for the Herrmann family. One of the bits of news they shared with their parents was that they had a trip to Europe planned the coming summer. On hearing the news, Lay was quick to comment, "Don't like what's goin' on over there in Germany...Austria, too...that Hitler fellow is a rable-rouser...not sure it's a safe place to travel right now." Again it was Loretta wh responded, "Dad, we'll be perfectly fine. You know we can take care of ourselves." Lay stroked his chin, looked over the top of his glasses (he'd just gottten new ones at Heitkamps the day before)..."I know there's no talkin' the two of you out of it. It just troubles me what Hitler and his gang are up to." The summer trip did not come up again during the sisters stay in Henderson. End of Part 2.
Next: A curious and chance conversation on Main Streer with Dr. Jaques Duclos. --To be continued

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4634 02/02/07 03:04 AM
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Part 3...The Herrmann sisters home in Henderson.
It was always enjoyable for the sisters to return to the town where they were born and went to school. Following graduation from the local high school--there was two years difference in the ages--they both went on to college in Mankato, then, wanting to see more of the country, accepted teaching jobs in Chicago. They had been had been in Chicago ten years now but Henderson still held an allure for them. The first day back, that December in 1933, they did what they always did the first day home...visit old friends along Main Street. In the post office Walter Comnick greeted them loudly: "Hey, Loretta...Minerva...heard you where back." After catching up on the news Walter reminded them, "Tonight there's caroling around the big tree in the Community square. You've gotta be there!" Assuring him they would--they both had excellent voices; Loretta, in fact taught music--they were out the door only to be stopped just a few doors upstreet by August Hoffman, the diminutive shoemaker. "I heard you girls might be be going to Germany this summer. You know, it was 15 years ago I came here from Bavaria...Passau...it was our home. If you travel there maybe you can deliver a message for me to my family?" And so it went up and down Main Street for the next few hours. In Blassing's Drug Store the sisters visited with Elsie Boelter who was working on the switchboard at the Henderson Telephone Company; the tiny phone company had its entire operation in a corner at the rear of Blassing's store. "Bet this is little smaller than your phone company offices in Chicago," Elsie laughed. Dr. Jacques Duclos was talking with druggist Blassing and came over to greet them. In the course of their brief conversation Loretta told him of their planned European trip the coming summer. "Where will you visit?" Duclos asked. "We'll be there two months and we're going to most of the capitals--London, Paris, Berlin..." Duclos interrupted her: "And how about Vienna?" Yes, Minerva, chimed in. "In fact, we are planning to attend a performance by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra..." "In the Vienna Opera House.." Loretta said, finishing the sentence. Duclos thought for a minute. "Before you leave to go back to Chicago...would you mind stopping by my office for a few minutes? I have..." he paused, as if looking for the right words..."I have something I'd like to talk with you about. Won't take long." Druggist Blassing interrupted the conversation at that point, "Doc, come here a moment...can't read your writing on this danged prescription...wish you'd write in English instead of French." he sisters assured Dr. Duclos they would indeed stop by his office. "Minerva...look at the time. We'd better get home for dinner so we can be back at the Community building for caroling. Loretta added as they left Blassings..."What do you suppose Doc wants to talk to us about?"
To be continued...

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4635 02/02/07 02:00 PM
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Part 4 in a continuing saga: The RCA radio console stood in a prominent location in the Herrmann living room, the image of the dog, Nipper, listening to "His Master's Voice," perched proudly on top. As Loretta and Minerva entered the house a voice announced on the radio: "This is William L. Shirer broadcasting live from Berlin. I'll be back with the news in a minute but first this word...

[singers: "Pepsi Cola hits the spot, twelve full ounces that's a lot; twice as much for a nickle, too; Pepsi Cola is the drink for you...nickle-nickle-nickle-nickle...trickle-trickle-trickle-trickle...Enjoy a Pepsi tonight.]

[Announcer: Now back to William L. Shirer in Berlin.]

"Today marks the first anniversary of Adolph Hitlers appointment as Chancellor in Germany. The events of the past year have been chilling, to say the least. The size of the German army has tripled in just 12 months. Armament factories are operating around the clock. And the Luftwaffe, the German air corps, already exceeds any other military air group in the world. Where is it heading? All of Europe is asking that question and beginning to grow very nervous. What are Hitler's plans? Will he be content to operate within the German borders, or does he have expansion in mind...expansion by the use this growing military might? All of Europe will be watching closely...and uneasily...in the year ahead. This is William L. Shirer speaking to you from Berlin, Germany. Good night...and Merry Christmas." Lay Herrmann sat in his easy chair listening carefully. He said nothing.

Outside a soft snow was falling. A perfect night for Christmas caroling.
---To be continued....

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4636 02/06/07 02:27 AM
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Part 5--How the lives of the Herrmann sisters of Henderson and Chicago would eventually intertwine with the story of Emily Rose...but we are not there yet.

The snow was falling heavier as the sisters headed out the door and up to join the Christmas carolers. Past the old firehouse...the little brick house where the Beechers lived. Smoke was puffing out of the chimney in Mark Dempsey's smoke house. Up Main...past Stelter-Monson Hardward; then Freddy Johnson's barber shop. Schultz Brothers store was open for Christmas shoppers as was the Henderson "Merc," or the Farmer's Store, as it was known. A tall, lighted pine--all of twenty feet high--stood in the center of the Community Square, and people were begnning to gather. A small brass ensemble was warming up under the attentive ear of George Zuckswerth. George was one of the town barbers but he was also the Music Man of Henderson. Margaret Foltz and Sadie Stelter called the carolers to order and took charge of the informal proceedings. Youngsters in the crowd passed out song sheets and the caroling was underway, Margaret and Sadie called out each song with George's ensemble leading the instrumental way. Most songs where sung in English and a few in German, as many in the gathering spoke that language fluently. Sadie's soprano voice was loud and brought to mind Kate Smith, a polular singer of the era, though without Smith's clarity and polish. As a finale, Margaret Foltz asked Minerva Herrmann if she would step forward and lead the group in Steligt Nacht [Silent Night] in German. It had not been prearranged but Minerva, who had studied music and possessed an excellent solo voice, was more than ready to do so. The fact that she was fluent in German made it all the more comfortable for her. It ended with loud applause for Minerva's performance. As the crowd was dispersing, Dr. Duclos made his was up to the sisters, with Win Workings, a writer at the Independent, in tow. "Wonderful, beautiful...Minerva, yes, you, too, Loretta." As they made their was down Main Street Duclos continued, "I just wanted to remind you, we were interrupted this afternoon in Blassings, I'd like you to stop by my office before you leave for Chicago. I've asked Win here to join us...you know him, of course?" Loretta: "Everyone in Henderson knows Win, but what's this all about?" "That will have to wait until later," Doc said.

The snow was falling even heavier now and was piling up on the sidewalks. At the corner of Fifth and Main the sisters headed north, Doc and Win continued on to Whitford's for a libation to cap off the evening.

"What do you suppose this is all about?" Loretta said as they headed toward home.

Next: Doc's story...and a request of the sisters. --To be continued.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4637 02/06/07 01:59 PM
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Don, thank you for stories based in a Henderson I only got a glimpse of growing up in the 50's. Loretta and Minerva were unforgettable and I swear Boonie's ghost is still hanging around on the second floor.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4638 02/10/07 04:22 PM
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Part 6--The Strange Story of Emily Rose." December 27, 1933. Loretta Herrmann picks up the phone in her parent's living room, gives it a crank, and the "central" on duty, Clarice Langworthy, answers: Yes, how may I help you?" Loretta: "Clarice? This is Loretta Herrmann, can you ring Dr. Duclos' office for me"? "I can do better than that, Loretta, he's right here in Blassing's Drug Store...so is Dr. Traxler...and his wife/nurse, Marie...it's a regular hospital here." Loretta again: "Don't bother them, Clarice, just tell Dr. Duclos to call me when he has a moment." [Heard in the background, "Hey, Doc...no, not you, the other Doc...Duclos. Call Loretta Herrmann wants you to call her when you can...." pause...]
"Just a minute, Loretta, he wants to talk to you now....hold on..." [pause]..."Loretta, yes, Dr. Duclos here...when can we get together?"

"We're leaving for Chicago the day after tomorrow so it will have to be this afternoon or tomorrow morning." Duclos: "Tell you what, I'll call Win Working and if he's available let's meet in my office at 4 o'clock this afternoon. Unless I call you right back can you plan to be then?" Loretta again, "Alright, Minerva and I will be at you office at 4 o'clock...Oh, can you let me talk with Clarice again?"

[pause...]"Yes, Loretta?..." "Clarice, I'm sorry we didn't get a chance to talk more at the caroling the other night but did want to tell you that Minerva and I are planning a trip to Europe this summer...and it brings back memories of your history classes when we were in high school. You were an inspiring teacher!"

"Well, you are so kind. I'll look forward to hearing more about it when you're back home."
"We'll do better than that," Loretta responded, "We're planning to keep a daily journal and we'll find a way to share our experiences with you in that way."

And so it went in the early days of telephone service in Henderson, in the days before the cell phone, the Blackberry, and the iPod.
--To be continued.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4639 02/11/07 07:50 PM
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Part 7: The Strange Story of Emly Rose. December 28, 1933.
The heavy snow that fell over Christmas left almost a foot of snow on the streets of Henderson. This morning dawned clear and cold. The thermometer on Lay Herrmann's garage read minus 14 degrees. Lay was across the street preparing to start up his sawmill. Henry "Hank" Gabbert was moving his steam engine up Fifth Street toward the lot, the steel lugs on the machine biting into the snow piled on the road. The plan was to drive Lay's biggest saw rig off of Hank's steam power. The Herrmann sisters stepped out doors at just that moment and Gabbert pulled the chain releasing a resounding whistle of "hello!" The sisters waved in the direction of Gabbert and his steam tractor. At the same time Edgar Schrupp was walking up Fifth on his way to work at Sibley County Bank. The three--the sisters and Edgar--watched as Hank expertly steered the tractor off the road and into position near the No. 1 saw rig. It was too cold for small talk, however, and besides, it was a quarter to eight, and Edgar had to open the bank this morning.

After breakfast the sisters busied themselves packing for their return to Chicago the following day. At noon the girls persuaded their mother to join them for lunch at Frenchie's Cafe, something she rarely did. "I can make lunch here," she insisted, but the sisters won out. Art Morrisette--known variously as "Frenchie," or "Tobey"--was serving a busy crowd that day. "Vegetable beef soup or the Blue Plate Special," he announced as the ladies sat down. The Blue Plate was a regular menu item at Frenchie's--sliced roast beef piled high on two pieces of bakery bread, topped with a scoop of mashed potatoes, and drowned in gravy. The three all opted for a bowl of the soup. It was a delightful lunch on that cold December day.

At 3:30 that afternoon the sisters bundled up and headed toward Dr. Duclos office on Main Street. Charley Buley was working the town grader moving the snow that had piled up the last few days. "Runnin' out of places to push it," he announced loudly to Sonny Borth who was watching intently. "Why not just wait for it melt," Sonny replied.

At Doc Duclos office the girls stomped the snow off their boots and removed their coats. Win Working was already there. Seated in Doc's inner office the conversation cut quickly to the subject. Doc proceeded to tell them the story of the German immigrant who had lived for a period of time in the shack at Devil's Jump-off; of the man's night visit to Doc's river camp and the trip up to look in on a sick girl; how another stranger had come and seemingly "cured" her when Doc couldn't seem to help. And finally, when Doc returned months later with young Fritz Kelm, the man denied anyone else had ever been there. The girls listened without a word.

"Now, my reason for wanting to talk with you: I know you're traveling to Europe this summer...Austria included." The girls nodded. "When this man returned to Austria I had a number of letters from him. He is a professor of psychology at the University of Vienna, a very gifted, learned educator. In fact, we exhanged letters over a period of some ten years. He never referred to what I call the incident at Devil's Jump-off...we exchaned views on medicine...we are both interested in the mind-body connection." Doc leaned back and relite his pipe. "Here's my favor: If you are in Vienna and have time, would you inquire at the University about Dr. August Heidelburg? The last letter I received from him was three years ago." He retrieved the letter from a desk drawer. "I'd just like to know if he's still there? And I'd like to resume our correspondence. He is a very remarkable man."

Loretta answered first: We will be in Vienna four days. We going to a Strauss opera conducted by Arturo Toscanini...and yes, I think we'll have the time and you have stirred our curiousity. Yes...we will do what we can." Doc extended Heideleburg's letter toward Loretta, "Here, take this with you...it might be useful. Now, Win has a favor of you, too."

"I would love to have you do a journal on your trip. I write for the Independent but I also do freelance work for a number of magaznes. I think there will be a market for your story." Minerva replied, "We always journal on our trips, so that will be no problem. However, as to publishing...well..." Win interrupted, "I can help you with that...editing...making the contacts...you might even be paid as much as a hundred dollars." Loretta let out a gasp: "Oh, that is a lot of money!" "I can't guarantee that but it's a possibility. With what going on in Germany now with Hitler and the Nazi Party your story takes on added interest. It is a historic time to be traveling there. So do keep a journal and when you return we'll talk more."

The sisters gathered up there coats, said their goodbyes, and were out the door. It was dark now as they made their way up Main Street, still somewhat uncertain about the story they'd just heard from Dr. Duclos and where it might fit into their summer travel plans.

In Doc's office Win spoke: "Wouldn't you like to be making that trip yourself, Doc?" "I'd love to...I envy them," Doc said as refilled his pipe with Black Velvet.

Next: Return to Chicago. --To be continued.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4640 02/14/07 05:51 PM
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Part 8--December 28, 1933. As the sun broke over the east rim of the valley, Booney Herrmann was loading his sisters' suitcases into the back of his Model A. He would drop them off at Berla's Livery and George would transport them to the depot in East Henderson. Then he would drive his parents and sisters to the depot to catch the 10:00 a.m. train to Minneapolis. Lay's sawmill was already humming. Mayor Ray Molitor and Hank Gabbert were busy cutting firewood. Molitor's saw rig was down for repairs so he was using Lay's machine. Lay and his wife were always sad to see the girls leave; Chicago was long distance from Henderson. With the girl's trip to Europe they knew they wouldn't see them again until late summer. Berla was already at the depot when they arrived and had the suitcases set out on the platform. Inside a number of men were gathered around the stove visiting. It was a daily ritual for those who lived nearby. Very often the depot and Agent Schumacher's teletype was where new information first reached town. Right on time the they heard the northbound train whistle announce the arrival and it screeched to stop, steam venting from around the engine's boiler.

After the goodbyes the sisters settled in for the hour-and-a-half trip to Minneapolis. Minerva reading a book; Loretta just looking at the passing countryside. Presently, somewhere around Jordan, Minerva had dozed off and Loretta took the letter that Dr. Duclos had given her out of her handbag. She could tell by the handwritting that it was in a cursive-style characteristic of Europe. Still the command of English was excellent. It primarily dealt with research that August Heidelburg, the writer, was doing and had apparently described to Duclos in earlier letters. One paragraph, however, caught her attention: "...The political atmosphere here at the University [Vienna] is highly charged. At our faculty meetings tempers often flare, especially among the history and political science professors. I try to stay out of it but my personal views are very opposed to what I am hearing from Hitler and the Third Reich.I'm afraid I'm not always able to conceal my views. I wish I knew where all of this is heading..."

About that time the train pulled into the station in Shakopee and Minerva woke up. The rest trip to Minneapolis and on to Chicago was uneventful. On the morning of December 29th they were back in their Chicago apartment and preparing for the start of school the following week.
Next: New details from National Geographic about
the upcoming European trip. To be continued...

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4641 02/16/07 02:46 PM
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Part 9--March, 1934. The following story appeared in National Geographics magazine:

"Thirty National Geographic Society members will be experiencing a memorable European trip this summer on a tour sponored and lead by the Society. The tour will depart from New York on June 10, on the Swedish-American liner M/S Kungsholm and will arrive in Copenhagen, Denmark, on June 19. The tour includes stops in Berlin, Munich, Vienna, Budapest and Rome. The tour was designed for Society members with a special interest in classical music. In Berlin the group will meet with high-ranking members of the German Reichsmusikkammer, the State Music Bureau. The highlight of the 5-week tour occurs in Vienna, Austria, where they will attend a performance of Richard Strauss' opera, "Die scweigsame Frau," at the famed Vienna Opera House, where the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra will be guest-conducted by Arturo Toscanini. The group is scheduled to meet in a private reception with both Strauss and Toscanini, as well as select members of the opera cast. It is rare for Strauss to agree to meet with groups. The tour has been sold out for months."

--To Be continued...

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4642 02/18/07 05:28 PM
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Part 10-- March 1934. Meanwhile back in Henderson:

John Hepp backed his Model A truck up the back door Dr. Duclos' residence on Main Street. The lettering on the truck read: "John Hepp's Henderson Pop Company." Hepp operated a pop bottling factory for many years and his last production run had been in November of 1933. Too much competition from the big bottlers, he told folks; and John was getting up in years. He still had a small inventory, however, and customers who wanted to buy it. Duclos, who had just returned from his morning walk to the post office, greeted him, "What do you have for me, John? Ginger beer?" "I can give you four cases...it's still my most popular item." Doc chuckled, "You ought to sell the recipe, John. Pepsi might buy it. Or you could just give it to me, how about it?" Hepp lugged the cases to Duclos back door. "Nope," he replied, "no sale." Then as an afterthought, "I think I'll just hide it someplace in clear sight. Someday, after I'm gone, someone will find it. You can probably guess what's in it...except for one secret ingredient. That's what makes it soooooooo good." Doc squared up his account with Hepp and went back to his office.

In the mail he had just picked up was a letter with foreign stamps on it...postmarked Austria...but no return address. He hastily opened it and was surprised to find a very short note from August Heidelburg his professional "pen-friend" from Vienna and the man whom he'd first met some fifteen years ago at the little shack out near Devil's Jump-off on Rush River. Quickly he retrieved his glasses from the jumble of papers on his desk and begin reading:

"My dear doctor friend in Henderson, USA: I have not had time to write to you recently. Events are moving all too swiftly here in Austria. Politics uber- alles, and I am not very adept at politics. Some of the authorities here at the University where I teach who have close ties to the Nazi Party have brought charges against me--claiming I have made statements...treasonous statements..against the government. While I do not agree with everything going on, I am loyal to my country...to Austria. Be that as it may, there is a real possibility I will lose my teaching and research position here at the University. Anyway, I did not write to burden you with my problems but simply to say that I have treasured the long-distance friendship we have had over these past years. Whatever is happening now in Europe I am hopeful that the American government will follow matters closely, and perhaps be a moderating influence if things do get out of hand, as I fear they might. I will try to keep in touch with you in the future. So, my good friend, Dr. Duclos, my best wishes to you."
[signed] Dr. August Heidelburg

Duclos settled back in his chair and stroked is goatee as he often did when something was troubling him. Perhaps, he thought, I should write to the Herrmann sisters about this latest turn of events. He reached for an envelope in his desk drawer and began to write.
--To be continued.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4643 02/19/07 11:27 AM
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Don, Just wanted to tell you how much I enjoy your story!! I also took time to read your book "Growing up in Henderson" It brought back many memories of Henderson that I have. Some that were in the book and others that were not!
Thanks for the memories, and waiting for more of this story!
Lisa

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4644 02/20/07 03:32 PM
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Part 11: May 1, 1934. The Herrmann sisters received the following letter from the National Geographic Society, signed by the Editor-in-Chief Gilbert Grosvenor:

"As a member of the National Geographic Society tour that will depart for Europe on June 15, you are cordially invited to a reception and dinner at 6:00 p.m. Saturday, June 12, 6:00 p.m. at the Society headquarters in Washington, D.C. You will have the opportunity to meet the thirty individuals who will be making the trip. At the meeting we will be briefed by Honorable William Edward Dodd, U.S. Ambassador to Germany; and by Stanley Donald, President of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra Company. The Honorable Mr. Dodd will speak to the group on current affairs in Germany. Mr. Donald will speak on the Strauss opera performance we will attend in Vienna, Austria. On the following day, Sunday, the group will depart by train for New York City. On Monday, June 14, we will board the M/S Kungsholm, preparing for departure the following day. We look forward to your being with us...Cordially, [signed] G. Grosvenor"

Loretta handed the letter to her sister saying, "Well, Minerva, seems we're traveling in high company. It's a long way from Henderson, isn't it?"
Next: About the M/S Kungsholm

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4645 02/20/07 07:20 PM
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"Growing up in Henderson" as the adopted son I should read that.

I loved watching those shows about Henderson on TV when I was growing up.

Remember the time litte Willie Olson got into the fight with Tony Nagel, or the one when Shawn Schroeder and Nellie Olson opened up that restaurant next to the shop. Man that was great.

How about the time Laura Ingalls and Jeff Steinborn, snuck behind the barn and.............

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4646 02/21/07 02:16 PM
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Part 12: May, 1934.
The Herrmann sisters, Loretta and Minerva, are preparing to depart on a trip to Europe. They will travel from New York City on the S/S Kungsholm, a ship owned by the Swedish-American Lines. For the benefit of our readers who desire to know more about the Kungsholm read on...

This famous liner was built in 1928 in the Blohm & Voss Shipyard in Hamburg, Germany. Her gross registered tonnage was 21,256 and her passenger capacity 1,544. The Kungsholm inaugurated cruises on January 19, 1929. The interior of the liner was designed by the Swedish architect, Carl Bergsten, and was a combination of Art Deco and modern functional. The captain of the Kungholm was Carl-Otto Claesson.

Next: Some surprises at the party before the departure.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4647 02/22/07 02:42 PM
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Part 13: June 13, 1934--Washington, D.C. Loretta and Minerva Herrmann had left Chicago two days earlier and traveled by train to the nation's capital. After checking into their hotel they taxied to the offices of the National Geographic Society where they would attend a gathering of some thirty people taking the Society-led tour to Europe. Upon arriving...

The sisters were greeted by Charles Herfandahl, the Society guide who will lead the tour. In a large conference room the assembled group met Gilbert Grosvenor, Editor of the National Geographic magazine. After preliminary remarks, Grosvenor asked each person to briefly introduce themselves: where they're from, and the reason they had decided to sign up for this particular tour. Most of the group was from the East Coast; there are business people, educators, a few professional musicians, both men and women. Aside from the Herrmann sisters--who still regarded themselves as Minnesotans--there were two other Minnesotans: Ann Berkshire, the director of the McPhail Institute of Music in Minneapolis; and William Ayers, a retired dectective from the Minneapolis Police Department.

Following the introductions, Grosvenor introduced the two guest speakers. Mr. Dodd, U.S. Ambassador to Germany, speaking off the record, said there was great concern throughout the capitals of Europe about the intentions of Adolph Hitler. "Many are concerned that he will move to assume dictatorial powers in Germany. Already he is building up the military, both ground and air forces. Germany's neighbors are growing increasingly nervous. You are traveling to Europe at a tense time in history." Donald Stanley's remarks were much more uplifting: "What an experience you are in for! To meet both Richard Strauss and Arturo Toscanini, two of the giant figures in music of the 20th Century. Your evening at the Vienna Opera House will be absolutely unforgettable."

Folowing the guests' speeched the group had a chance to mingle and visit. The Minnesotans naturally sought out each other. William Ayers, the Minnepolis detective, approached the sisters:
"You said you are from Henderson...I have some relatives living there...perhaps you know my uncle, Ben Ayers...and my cousin, Irma." Indeed, the sisters said, they knew both Ben and Irma very well. "Police work must run in the family," Loretta said. "Ben was the constable in Henderson...and wasn't he Sibley County Sheriff, too?" Ayer replied that his uncle had indeed been both constable and sheriff." Ann Berkshire shared with the trio her excitement over the upcoming Vienna performance. She had studied at Juliard in New York and had seen Toscanini direct the New York Philharmonic on several occasions.

At a dinner that followed waiters poured champagne. Prohibition had just been repealed the year before [1933] and Minerva remarked to those around her that she wasn't very experienced at drinking, to which Loretta chimed in, "Unless you count the 'moonshine' from that still out in Jessenland...who were those Irish brothers?" Blushing just ever so slightly, Minerva told Loretta she must have been suffering from a poor memory. "The Irish never had an stills in Jessenland-they were in Tyrone."

The evening ended early. The following morning they would board the train for New York.

Next: On board the S/S Kungsholm

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4648 02/22/07 04:23 PM
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There was no moonshine ever made or consumed in Jessenland.

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Don't they still serve it at the Brass Top? Mystery Shot #2?

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Didn't Enoch give us a moonshine at Kraut Days a few years ago?

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4651 02/23/07 04:43 PM
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Part 14: June 15, 1934. Radios in and around Henderson--including the RCA console in Lay Herrmann's living room--were tuned to 8-3-0 WCCO, "Good Neighbor to the Northwest."

"Hello, this is Cedric Adams with the Noontime News..brought to you today by Wheaties...the breakfast of champions...the best breakfast food in the land.

"Our lead story today is about four Minnesotans who left this morning from New York City on the Swedish-American ocean liner Kungsholm. Among the 1500 passengers were: Ann Berkshire, of the McPhail School of Music; retired police detective Bill Ayers; and two school teachers originally from Henderson, our favorite town on the Minnesota River, Loretta and Minerva Herrmann. The Minnesotans will be spending a month in Europe capped off by a Strauss opera performance in Vienna, Austria, where Arturo Toscanini will conduct the orchestra. Ann Berkshire has told us that she would make every effort to contact us on Noontime News following the Vienna performance. Turning next to......"

Lay Herrmann turned to his wife and said: "Sounds like they're on their way." Doc Duclos, who seldom listened to Cedric's program, remarked to no one in particular..."What an exciting time for the girls." Gus Buck had the radio on in the Independent office and was listening along with reporter Win Working and commented: "I hope they bring some good stories back we can share with our readers." "Maybe more than we think," Win said.

Next: On board the ocean liner Kungsholm. Dinner with singer and screen actress Jeanette MacDonald. To be continued...

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4652 02/24/07 03:26 PM
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Part 14: June 18, 1934--Somewhere out on the Atlantic.
As is the custom on ocean liners, honored guests are invited to sit at the Captain's Table for dinner each evening. Among those at Captain Carl-Otto Claesson's table this evening were the four Minnesotans. Also seated at Loretta Herrmann's left was Jeanette MacDonald, the American singer and actress best remembered for a number of films she starred in with Maurice Chevalier, and her movies and stage appearances with Nelson Eddy. On the other side of the table Minerva was seated next to Sweden's Prince Bertil and Crown Princess Louise.

MacDonald was making several performances in Europe, including the 'Merry Widow Opera' in Munich. She, too, was planning to be at the Vienna performance of Richard Strauss' opera and the private audience with Strauss and Arturo Toscanini. Prince Betil's party was on their way back to Stockholm after attending a dedication ceremony at the American-Swedish Insitute in Minneapolis. Both of the sisters had developed a teachers knack for asking artful questions and being attentive listeners. It served them well at the table this evening. They were regaled by Ms. MacDonald with stories of her many motion pictures and celebrities she knew. Asked about Chevalier's recording of "Thank heavens for little girls..." she remarked: "No one...absolutely no one...can sing a song quite like Maurice." Prince Bertil, on the other hand, was reserved, almost shy, but enjoyable table company.

Captain Claesson informed the group that the Kungsholm was making good time in seas that were remarkable calm for mid-June, and that he expected they would be in Copenhagen harbor by Wednesday. "If you have the time you must go to Tivoli, the amusement park in Copenhagen. There is nothing like it anywhere in the world."

During the dinner Bill Ayers, the retired Minneapolis police detective, was engrossed in a very interesting conversation with a British counterpart from Scotland Yards. Gordon Yardley was on official business--precisely what he would not say--but he did confide to Ayers that German espionage activity had increased considerably in the past two years, paralleling Hitler's rise to power. "A word of advice," he said to Ayers, "If for any reason you find yourself in any diplomatic difficulties, seek the assistance of your embassy or consulate. You can't deal with the German authorities on your own." Ayers filed away the thought...not thinking he'd have any cause to activate it.

To be continued...Arrival in Copenhagen and on to Berlin.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4653 02/25/07 05:19 PM
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Part 15--[Parts of the Herrmann sisters' journal are missing--notably their arrival in Copenhagen. We pick up their story in Berlin. It is June 27, 1934].

The tour group is staying at the historic Kampinski Hotel in Berlin...just a short, walking distance from the Reichsmusikkammer [the State Music Bureau]. On this Thursday morning the group had breakfast and a government representative suggested they leave their belongings in their hotel rooms. "It will be a fairly long day and it will just be easier." A fifteen minute walk brought them to Music Bureau building and during the course of the day--including wonderful German buffet lunch--various staff members of the Reichmusikkammer reviewed with them highlihts of a cultural Renaissance going on under the Third Reich. It was a very impressive day. Most interesting was the entertainment planned for the Summer Olympic games scheduled in Berlin in 1936. Toward the end of the program an attache in charge announced that they would be meeting with a special high government official. The doors opened and a decorated military officer entered the room and strod to the podium with great authority...

"Good afternoon...I am Joseph Goebbels...welcome to Berlin." He spoke in somewhat halting English. "So...how many of you speak German? If I sometimes search for the right words in English...I might resort to German to make a point." A spattering of hands went up including both the Herrmann sisters and Bill Ayers. They had grown up in German-speaking homes and communities, and both of the girls had studied German at the University. Goebbels surveyed the group, noting the showing of hands. "Good, so let us proceed." For more than a half-hour he ranged over a variety of topics, charming the group with his stories and easy informality. Then at what seemed like a purposeful pause...he suddenly lapsed into German...directed his outstretched hand toward Loretta and Minerva and said, "Some of you I know have friends in Europe...you two...you know, of course...[pausing again for effect] Professor Dr. August Heidelburg...in Vienna, I believe, yes? I'm sure you will enjoy your visit there." Rapidly switching back to English Goebbels continued on. The Herrmann sisters sat stunned! Had they heard Goebbels correctly? How could he possibly know...? Bill Ayers also had caught Goebbels off-hand comments to the sisters and noted the startled reaction it produced. Why, he did not understand. What's going on here? the detective thought to himself.

To be continued...

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4654 02/26/07 02:53 PM
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Part 16: Immediately following...back at the Kampinski Hotel. The Herrmann sisters are in their room talking with Bill Ayers, the retired Minneapolis police detective

"Can you tell me what's going on?" Ayers says. Loretta: "I hardly know where to start"...but she launched into the story related to them by Dr. Duclos back in Henderson. Ayers listened carefully without saying a word. At some length Loretta took a deep breath and said, "And that's the whole story as we heard it...." then adding, "But how in the world could that officer...that Goebbels fellow...know aything about it?...he even knew Heidelburgs name?"

Ayers was quiet for a time, finally saying, "Well, it's clear...they were in your room while you were away. You said you had letters that this Duclos man in Henderson gave you. Where are they? Are they still here?" Loretta quickly searched through her suitcase. "Yes, they're still here." "I assure you, someone was in here, went through your belongs and came across those letters." Minerva joined in excitedly, "They can't do that! Can't we report them to the authorties?" "They are the authorities, Minerva, they decide what they can do and not do."

"Fine," Loretta went on, "but now what?" Ayers replied, "This is just a shot across the bow, so to speak. They're telling you, 'We know you're up to something...we don't know what...but whatever it is...stop it!'" Ayers continued,
"Unless there's something about this August Heidelburg we don't know. Maybe he's more important...a bigger fish...then we know." Ayers was quiet for a long time, finally saying, "I had a conversation on the Kungsholm coming over with a Scotland Yard investigator; he told me if I ever ran into diffulties in Germany I should check with the U.S. Embassy. We might be into something over our heads. I'll go to the Embassy, tell them about our meeting Ambassador Dodd in Washington, D.C. and ask their advice."

Next: Ayers trip to the U.S. Embassy To be continued...

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4655 02/27/07 02:15 PM
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Part 17--June 28, 1934. Bill Ayers is at the U.S. Embassy in Berlin shortly after it opens. To the receptionist he explains he has a matter concerning intimidation of U.S. citizens by German authorities. He further explains he is traveling with a group from the National Geographic Society. He is ushered into a conference room and presently an embassy officer comes in. Ayers mentions his group meeting with Ambassador Dodd two weeks earlier in Washington D.C. The detective then went on to describe the incident that occured the previous day at the Reichsmusikkammer offices. The officer listened patiently and at length answered. "I can believe what you've described. Yes, things like this are happening. Among some in the German government there is a sort of paranoia with security. At this point there is little we can do about it without provoking retaliation." Ayers, trained in investigative procedures, pressed forward with another question: "What can you tell me about William Heidelburg?" The embassy officer disappeared for several minutes and returned with a single file folder. Paging through it he stopped and said, "We know of him. There's little I can tell you. He's an Austrian citizen and--where are you traveling from here?" "Vienna," Ayers replied. "Yes...let me suggest this, I'm going to give you a letter of introduction to my counterpart at the Embassy in Vienna. If you'll present that to him when you arrive there he can pick up this trail and perhaps help you." A secretary entered the room and the man proceeded to dictate a short letter for Ayers to take with him. "One other bit of advice," the man continued, "When you get to Austria I would NOT go to the University of Vienna and make inquiries about this fellow...Heidelburg. It will just open up Pandora's box. There are some zealots there who are better off not riled up. My guess is that Heidelburg succeeded in doing that...perhaps to his own detriment."

As the man walked with Ayers to the door he offered some parting words, "This is a beautiful country, Mr. Ayers, enjoy your stay here. There are some overly ambitious people here but, for the most part, the Germans--and the Austrians--are wonderful people. Try not to let this incident distract you from that."

[The Society members departed Berlin two days later. During a two day stop in Munich they had a chance encounter with singer/actress Jeanette MacDonald one evening at the Bavaria Hus restaurant. "I will see you all in Vienna next week," she told them.

Next--Vienna: Strauss, Toscanini and others.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4656 02/28/07 02:58 PM
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Part 18: July 2, 1934--Vienna, Austria.

Early on the first morning of the Society tour groups first day in Vienna, Bill Ayers made his way to the U.S. Embassy, where he presented the letter he was carrying from the attache in Berlin. The meeting he had was cordial but guarded. "Tell me what you're trying to learn and why you need to know it?" he was asked. Finally convinced of Ayers authenticity, the Embassy staffer called for some files and after a few minutes study said, "We have a file on Professor Heidelburg but there's little light I can shed on him. It appears he was removed from his teaching duties at the University, later charged with plots against the government...[pause as he read further]...the evidence against him appears to be largely circumstantial...and...he is currently in jail pending charges; here's one other entry: pro-democratic position, and has made anti-Nazi statements. It appears the professor has irritated some high ranking people in the wrong places."

Ayers thought for a moment. "What would you suggest if you wanted to contact this person, help him in some way?" "I'd stay out of it, Mr. Ayers. Things are rather stable here in Austria right now but longer term the the worst case scenario is "anchluss," or annexation. If Germany ever moves to annex Austria the professor could be out of circulation for a long time. If you're really bent on helping him I'd suggest working through diplomatic channels starting back in Washington; and doing so while Austria is a still a somewhat free and independent country." Ayers offered his thanks and made his way back to the hotel where he filled in the Herrmann sisters with what little he had learned. The next evening they would be attending the performance at the Vienna Opera House.

The relationship between Richard Strauss, the composser, and Arturo Toscanini, the director, was a complicated one. Strauss was believed by some to be too cozy with the Third Reich and the Nazi Party. He was president of the Reichsmusikkammer (appointed by Joseph Goebbels) and was instrumental in setting up the private audience that would follow tomorrow's opera performance. Toscanini was skeptical Strauss politics and was reported to have said, "To Strauss the composer I take off my hat; to Strauss the man I put it on again."

Such were the times in Germany-Austria when the Herrmann sisters visited there in the summer of 1934.

The opera and back stage. To be continued...

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4657 03/01/07 01:41 PM
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Part 19--July 5, 1934.
The Strauss opera was a resounding success. Despite high ticket prices ($10.00 U.S. currency equivalent) it was a sellout. Following the performance the National Geographic tour group was escorted back stage to meet with Richard Strauss, Arturo Toscanini, and members of the cast. For music lovers it was a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Because the Herrmann sisters--and Bill Ayers--were so fluent in the German language it was easy for them to converse their way around the room. At one point the sisters were talking with a cast member, a young Austrian woman, perhaps in her late 20s, who introduced herself as Anna Karol. Ms. Karol, a mezzo-soprano and new to the Vienna Opera Company, nonetheless had a major role in the opera. As they visited comfortable in German, Ms. Karol asked the sisters where in America they were from. When the town Henderson in Minnesota came up Anna Karol reacted in a startled manner. "Is that a small community...located on a river?" she asked. "Yes, do you know it?" Minerva responded.
Ms. Karol did not answer directly but moved the conversation to another subject. Still, the sisters noticed a change in her composure. Presently Ms. Karol said, "Could we meet again tomorrow? I would love talking with you more. In the morning maybe?" Loretta answered, "We would enjoy that." "There is a coffee house across the street from here, by the stairway entrance to the subway...Otto's Coffee House, it is. You can't miss it. Could you be there at say, nine o'clock?" "Fine," Loretta said, "We'd like to bring a friend with us, Mr. Ayers...the gentleman right over there," she said pointing at Ayers. "That would be fine...I'll see you then."

"Did you notice an unusual reaction from her when we mentioned Henderson?" Minerva asked. "I certainly did and I have no idea what it's all about," Loretta said.

Next: Coffee at Otto's and a surprise.

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Part 19--July 6, 1934: Otto's Coffee House in Vienna.
When the Herrmann sisters and Bill Ayers arrived at the Coffee House Anna Karol was waiting. The new arrivals order coffee Americano--the European coffee blend being too stout for their tastes. Ms. Karol begins the conversation. "I'm sorry if I was abrupt or mysterious last night but I did not want to discuss this subject with you at the Opera House. When you mentioned last night that you are from Henderson...it is such a coincidence...you see I was there once, many years ago, perhaps fifteen, with my father." The sisters, though surprised, said nothing. Ms. Karol continued. "My having been in Henderson, however, is not what I want to talk about. I can later...but I am here to ask for your help. My father, William Heidelburg, a university political science professor, is in jail now; he is a political prisoner. He has done nothing wrong except to speak his mind, and for that the government has arrested him." Ayers spoke, "And how might we help?" "I believe that your government is one of the few that can put pressure on the Austrian government... human rights pressure. That is the only way they might listen here in Vienna."

Ayers went on: "Your last name is Karol, your father is Heidelburg?" Ms. Karol said, "Oh, that. When I begin to perform professionally I took my mother's maiden name believing it was a better, softer name on the stage. I was Emily Rose Heidelburg for the first twenty years of my life." Now Loretta spoke up. "We must be open with you, my dear, we know something about you and your father." Karols set down her coffee cup, "How? What...?" she stammered. Loretta proceeded to tell her about Dr. Jacques Duclos and the letters he had exchanged over the years with her father. Anna Karol: "This is astonishing...absolutely unbelieveable! Yes, I remember my father talking about this Doctor...Duclos...he called him his American Doctor friend. I cannot believe you are connected to the time years ago we were in America."
Next: A plan begins to take shape...and more about what occured that night years ago at Devil's Jump-off.

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Part 20--July 7, 1934

The following morning Ayers was back at the U.S. Embassy and after a brief discussion with his contact of two days earlier he was ushered into the office of the American Ambassador to Austria, George Messersmith. The ambassador expressed keen interest in the Heidelburg story and Ayers' involvement in it. "There's no question but what his arrest is a pure-and-simple political matter," the ambassador said. "He's a brilliant scholar and all of us would be better off if he were a free man. The question is: what can we do to facilitate that?"
Ayers waited for Messersmith to continue. "Here's one idea: If his daughter were to emigrate to America and become a U.S. citizen we could could apply pressure for his release. It's a plan not without risk but if Austria continues to be sucked further into Germany's sphere of influence it will become even more difficult." Ayers spoke up: "I believe my group would be interested in trying to accomdate his daughters move to the U.S." He paused then continued, "We are leaving for home in two weeks...too soon for us to do anything directly...but there is a woman--Jeanette MacDonald, the actress, you would know of her, certainly--who will be returning in September. Since Anna Karol/Emily Rose Heidelburg is an opera performer, it would make perfect sense for her to travel with Ms. MacDonald." Messersmith answered, "I know Jeanette, she is here in Vienna now, and we are having dinner with her tomorrow evening. I'll float this thought with her. With Anna/Emily Rose in New York we could begin to work diplomatically on William's release. Excellent idea...Mr. Ay---...Bill. We will get word back to you."

Back at the hotel Ayers proceeded to fill the Herrmann sisters in on his meeting with Ambassador Messersmith. Minerva's reaction was, "My goodness, I hope we aren't getting ourselves into a real pickle. All because of an innocent conversation last Christmas with Dr. Duclos. What will happen next."

What indeed. To be continued...

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Part 21--July 10: Departing Vienna.
The Herrmann sisters and Bill Ayers had heard nothing from the embassy in the three days that had elapsed since the meeting. Now, as they prepared to leave Vienna for Budapest, they discussed what, if anything, they might do. In the hours prior to checking out of the hotel Ayers had a knock on his door. opened it and saw his contact at the embassy standing there. Inside he announced, "The plan is in motion but it will take time; how much we don't know. We won't be able to give you updates as you travel to Budpest and then on to Rome." Ayers responded, "So you're telling me to sit tight, hope for the best?" "I wish I could be more precise but that's the nature of actions like this. It entirely possible that when you depart Rome for New York you'll not hear from us. My advice: Relax and enjoy the trip. That's what you came for. This bit of intrigue is not what you signed up for." As the attache preprared to leave he said, "We do have your addresses back home and when we have news you'll hear from the State Department, most likely. Enjoy the rest of your stay. Budapest and Rome are exciting cities." With that the two men parted ways.
"A watched teapot does not boil."
To be continued...

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Part 22--"Enjoy your visit..." the advice of the attache in the embassy in Vienna rang in to the ears of the Herrmann sisters and Bill Ayers..."That's what you came here for." And for the next two weeks that's precisely what they did. First, to Budapest, Hungary, on the Danube--the "City of Bridges"; in many ways even more captivating than Vienna. Then across the low mountains over into Italy: Venice, Padua, Bologna, and a stopover in Florence. The Herrmann sisters, students of history, were enthralled by the city, the people, the churches, and the art museums. Finally to Rome the "Enternal City." They did what all visitors to Rome did--they gave in to the magic of the city. The Fountain of Trevi; the Spanish Steps; St. Peter's and the Vatican. Bill Ayer made one exception. On a walk down the Via Veneto they passed the U.S. Embassy. "Let's check. It won't hurt." With the sisters in tow they entered the embassy and Ayers presented the introductory letter he had originally received from the attache in Berlin. The letter got them past the receptionist but little more. After explaining their interest, an embassy officer replied, "Sorry, we can't help you. Even if we knew anything we couldn't talk about it. Oh, by the way...since you're in the area there's a wonderful coffee house two blocks down on the Piazza Barberini. Wonderful pastries! I think you'll enjoy it." They headed down the Via Veneto straight to the shop on the Barberini. Every bit as good as "advertised."

Three days later the group departed for Civitaveccia, the port servicing Rome, and boarded the ocean liner SS Gripsholm for the return home. On August 6 they arrived in New York. There they boarded the train for Minneaapolis. They persuaded Bill Ayer to continue on with them to Henderson. Ayer had not seen his Uncle Ben in some time so he looked forward to a brief visit with his Henderson relatives.
"Back in Henderson on the River."

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4662 03/07/07 02:38 PM
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Part 23: It was a hot, steamy mid-August afternoon when the Herrmann sisters and Bill Ayers stepped off the train and onto the platform at the depot in East Henderson. The Berla Livery truck was parked nearby and George was unloading boxes for shipment on the next northbound train. Inside the depot building agent Bill Schumaker was taking down an incoming message on the tap-tapping telegraph machine. Bill Ayers, who understood Morse code, stopped to make out the words as they transmitted. At length the depot agent looked up and greeted them. Ayers had worked as a railroad detective in earlier years and knew the salty Bill Schumaker quite well. "Nice to see you back here. I was asking about you just last week when I saw your Uncle Ben." Berla had loaded their bags onto his truck and soon they were making their way along the narrow dusty gravel road that hugged the east bank of the river leading to Henderson. "Water's really low," Berla offered. "As low as you ever see it. Do we need rain!" After dropping the sisters off at their home on North Fifth Street Berla headed for Lehman's place on Main Street. "You can get a room here," he told Ayers. Lehman's had earlier been a hotel, was converted to a private residence, but still made a business of renting out upstairs roms.

Over the next several days returned travelers visited with friends in the area. Ayers dropped in to see cousin Irma at the Farmer's Store and caught up on town and family news with Uncle Ben.
On Tuesday after their return Loretta had set up a meeting with Dr. Jacques Duclos at his office. Win Workings, the Henderson Independent reporter was invited to join them. For an hour the sisters and Ayers related the tale of their meeting in Berlin and how the German minister Goebbels had surprised them with the offhand reference to Professor Heidelburg; how Ayers had gone to the U.S. Embassy for guidance; that they learned that Heidelburg had been arrested; how they met the opera singer Anna Karols, who turned out to be Heidelburg's daughter, Emily Rose; and the possibility that she might be coming to the United States. At the conclusion Win Workings spoke first, "Outside of that, did anything really exciting happen?" Duclos added, "It sounds as though I might have put you at some risk by giving you that letter and by asking you to make inquiries about Heidelburg. I'm sorry about that." Loretta spoke up, "Actually, Doc, it made our trip much more interesting and exciting. And I don't really believe were in in any danger." Minerva added, "And it gave us the opportunity to get to know Bill Ayers. He was so much help during the whole trip."

"Tell me," Duclos asked, "Did Ms. Karol...Emily Rose...did she make any mention of Henderson? Did the subject of Hnenderson come up at all?"
Loretta answered, "She did indeed. She started her discussion with us at the coffee house that morning by saying that she had been in Henderson when she was a very young girl." Minerva chimed in, "She also said she'd tell us more about that later but things happened so fast we never got back to the subject. So, we're still in the dark about that." Duclos replied, "Well, I'm still curious, the important thing, however, is their lives and well being and where it goes from here."

By the end of the week the sisters packed for their return to Chicago. The school year would start in two weeks and they had much work to do.
They traveled by train to Minneapolis with Ayers where they said goodbye. "We'll let you know if we hear anything, Bill." With that they made their separate ways.
To be continued...

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4663 03/08/07 07:18 PM
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Part 24: Mid-October, 1934. Chicago, Illinois.
The phone rang in the home of Loretta and Minerva Herrmann. Loretta answered and a woman's voice greeted her: "My name is Elizabeth Smith...I'm calling from Washington, D.C...from the office of the Secretary of State, Cordell Hull." She continued: "I believe you're familiar with the situation surrounding one August Heidelburg and his daughter?" Loretta answered in the affirmative. "Ms. Anna Karol has asked that we notify you that she is in Washington now having arrived earlier this week. She will be here for several days before traveling to New York in the company of Ms. Jeanette MacDonald. She asked that we advise you that she is well and will call you when she arrives in New York." Loretta quickly interjected: "Do you have any news on her father?" "I'm afraid I'm not in a position to answer that," Ms. Smith answered politely. After exchanging pleasantries Loretta hung up the phone. "Well," she said taking a deep breath, "she made it this far."
Next: New York and the Metropolitan Opera.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose #4664 03/09/07 02:09 PM
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Part 25--Where we are: Anna Karol a.k.a. Emily Rose Heidelburg, had emigrated to the U.S. and with the help of friends auditioned and appeared in several Metropolitan Opera productions. Critics have been favorably impressed. Meanwhile, her father remains in jail somewhere in Austria on trumped-up poliical charges.

We fast-forward now to the summer of 1935. The political atmosphere continued to heat up across Europe as Germany under Chancellor Adolph Hitler further flexed its military muscle. Few European governments were willing to confront Hitler. "Ignore him and he will go away," seemed to be the attitude of most. In the U.S., however, Cordell Hull, Secretary of State in Franklin Roosevelt's administration, took a special interest in August Heidelburg's case. Diplomacy is based on mutual back-scratching and Hull discovered that the Austrian government was interested in gaining some concessions from the American government. In a complicated exchange of "favors" the U.S. succeeded in securing Heidelburg release. In the summer of 1935 he was on an ocean liner bound for New York City.

After a debriefing by the State Department Heidelburg was reunited with his daughter. With the help of friends--among them singer/actress Jeanette MacDonald--he was successful in securing a teaching position in a university in upstate New York. Life began to take on some semblance of normalcy for both the educator- father and the opera singer-daughter. Anna had established some contact with the Herrmann sisters. Now August sat at his desk one evening and began to write what he knew was a long overdue letter:

"My dear friend, Dr. Jacques Duclos...."

To be continued.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose [Re: Don Osell] #7388 03/12/07 11:57 AM
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Part 26:

"...I hardly know how or where to start this letter. It has been close to twenty years since I last saw you...and several years since we last exchanged letters. So much has happened...so very, very much. I am in America now, teaching psychology at Eastern New York University. In a way we, my daughter and I, owe our being here to you. Emily Rose is in New York City now and appearing in La Traviata at the Metropolitan Opera. If you see the cast listing her stage name is Anna Karol. Yes, your conversation with Loretta and Minerva Herrmann, and then their inquiries about me in Germany and Austria, set off a chain of events that brought us to where we are today. For that we will be forever grateful to you.

"There are some answers I owe you reaching way back to that night many years ago when I knocked on the door at your little cabin on the river. And about what really happened at the place where I was staying...what was it you called it, Devil's Jump-Off? Yes, I think it was. I will not attempt to cover such a complicated story in a letter; I could not do it justice; but I owe you the truth about what happened and why it was I was so secretive about everything.

"When this term is over at the university I plan to travel to Henderson and visit with you. I will ask Emily Rose to travel with me. We can then have a face-to-face conversation and I will tell you about that time so many years ago. I should like to see that little shack out there on Devil's Jump-Off if it is still standing. It would not be surprising if the winds had blown it down. Thankfully we did not have to spend the whole winter there. The early snow storm we did experience there was enough. Are the boys who came to visit me still around? One I remember was Fritz...was it Kelm? And the Johnson boy...didn't they called him 'Swede.' yes? It would be nice to see them again. They are grown men now. I remember, too, the wonderful reception we had in that marvelous brick building in Henderson after we were rescued from the snow storm.

"I will stay in touch with you and let you know more about our travel plans. For now I remain, your good friend...August Heidelburg." [Dated February 15, 1935.]
To be continued.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose [Re: Don Osell] #7411 03/13/07 03:17 PM
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Part 27: July 1, 1936
August Heidelburg and his daughter, Emily Rose, boarded a train in New York's Grand Central Station bound for Henderson. By pre-arrangement, they met up with Bill Ayers, the retired police detective, in Minneapolis, and continued the final leg of the trip on the C&NW to Henderson. The Herrmann sisters and Dr. Duclos were aware of their travel itinerary and looking forward to their visit. They were met by an entourage at the depot in East Henderson. Among those there to welcome them: The entire Herrmann family, Dr. Duclos, Gus Buck and Win Working from the Independent, Ben Ayers; even the mayor, Ray Molitor. After all, the visitors included a nenowned international professor and a New York Met Opera star, not everyday visitors to the historic little town on the Minnesota River.

They arrived in the midst of one of the hotest summers on record in Minnesota. The days immediately preceding their arrival had been in the 90s and on this day the forecast was for the mercury to climb to 100 degrees! The three arrivals checked into their rooms at the Lehmann boarding house, which conveniently was located next to Duclos' office on Main between Third and Fourth Streets.

Out on the street they walked up Main headed for a luncheon planned at Frenchie's Cafe. In front of the post office, however, they noted a crowd gathered on the sidewalk. "Wonder what that's all about?" "Booney" Herrmann remarked. In the crowd they noted "Bit" and Leo Whitford, Fred Laabs, "Skinny" Brahs, Mark Dempsey, Dr. and Marie Traxler, and--with a camera--Win Working. "What in tarnation...?" Lay Herrmann exclaimed. Kneeling in the middle of the group was postmaster Carl "Jittle" Beecher and his assistant, Walter Comnick. Beecher had cracked two eggs on the sidewalk; Comnick was standing over them holding a spatula. "You guys gone goofy?" "Booney" Herrmann asked. "Jittle" answered: "Did you ever hear the saying, 'It's so hot you can fry an egg on the sidewalk'? Well, we're about to find out." Minutes later the two would-be 'fry-cooks' stood up and Comnick said, "Look! They're turning white around the edges. Should I get the bacon?"

Watching the antics, August Heidelburg, the psychologist, remarked, "The people here have a sense of humor. That is good for a community."

The day went by swiftly and the travelers, weary from the long trip, retired early. The plan for the next day included a trip out to Devil's Jump-Off on Rush River. Heidelburg had expressed great interest in returning to the place he had lived for several months almost eighteen years ago. Interest and curiousity ran high among townsfolk. At least three cars were lined up to make the trip. Thus far Heidelburg had revealed nothing about why he had been there...nor the events that surrounded his stay.

Next: The trip to Devil's Jump-Off.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose [Re: Don Osell] #7415 03/14/07 02:58 PM
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Part 28--July 2, 1936:
By mid-morning a four-car caravan was forming on Main Street. The lead car was Doc Duclos' 1934 Willys-Knight, and in it, along with Doc, was Professor Heidelburg and Emily Rose. Next, "Booney" Herrmann's Model A with his sisters, Loretta and Minerva. Then, Ben Ayers, also piloting a Model A Ford, with his nephew, Detective Bill, in the front seat beside him, and Win Working, the Independent reporter, in the back. Bringing up the rear was Fritz Kelm in a 1934 Ford pickup he'd just purchased at Steckman Brothers ("Frank and 'Butch' gave me a deal I couldn't refuse," Fritz proudly announced.) Riding with Fritz: The Johnson brothers, "Swede" and "Bubber," and Harold Haas; the four who had been caught in the snow storm with Heidelburg, lo those many years ago.

West on 19 to the top of the hill the caravan drove; then over the network of gravel roads, crossing the bridge past Langes, to the Devil's Jump-Off area on Rush River. Doc commented as they drove that it was the route they'd taken back to Henderson that snowy afternoon back in '18.

As he stepped out of the car near Devil's Jmp-Off, Heidelburg felt an adrenaline "rush" as his thoughts went back to 1918. "It seems like a different lifetime," he thought to himself. It was a half-mile hike from the road to the site of the old shack, and as they came over a knoll the building came into view...what was left of it, at least. Roof half caved in, windows broken, front door missing. One strong wind away from total demolishment.

Emily Rose spoke up, "The creek...it looks so different from what I remember. There was a lot of water in it then, now it's almost dry." "The dry summer," Fritz Kelm spoke up, "We've had almost no rain." The conversation moved to the snow storm and the Johnson brothers, Kelm and Harold Haas all reminisced about the days they had been snow-bound. "It was fun," Fritz Kelm said, "After we got to know Mr. Heidelburg and we really knew we were safe there. We knew the snow would end and people would be out to get us." The small talk continued for the next half-hour as the group slowly walked back to the road and their cars.

Back in town, Working invited the visitors to stop by the Independent office above the Sibley County Bank. Editor/Publisher/Owner Gus Buck scrambled to locate chairs among the piles of old newspapers; Gus wasn't much into filing. "We'd like to do a story on you," he said to the Heidelburgs. "Can we arrange that?" The professor answered slowly and thoughtfully, "We are meeting tomorrow morning in Dr. Duclos office...I believe Mr. Working is invited...we shall talk then. But am not sure we are much of a story. We are not much for publicity. But...we'll see..."

Next: Duclos office. The story unfolds.

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Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose [Re: Don Osell] #7426 03/15/07 02:40 PM
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Part 29, July 3, 1936:
Another hot day. The following gathered together in Dr. Duclos' office: August and Emily Rose Heidelburg, Loretta and Minerva Herrmann, Win Working, Bill Ayers and, of course, the doctor himself. Professor Heidelburg is the first to open the discussion on the subject of his visit to Henderson in 1918.

"We had experienced a tragedy in our family back in Vienna. I was devastated and lost interest in my work and most of the things in my life. A friend suggested I get away and try to refocus. 'You need a complete change of scenery,' he advised. So, with Emily Rose with me I decided to go to St. Paul where we had friends. Once there they told me about some property they owned near Henderson...and that there was a small cabin there that was quite liveable." Heideburg paused to collect his thoughts.

"We decided to go on to Henderson...actually we went to Le Sueur...and finally found our way to property out there on Rush River. The cabin turned out to be less than it had been described to us...but, yes, it was quite liveable...and we absolutely loved the countryside. Things were going very well. I felt as though I was getting a new lease on life. What I came for I was finding.

"Then came the day that Emily Rose became ill...and that fateful night I pounded on the door of your cabin on the Minnesota River.
I felt as though a nightmare was starting all over again."

For a while no one spoke. Finally Duclos broke the silence. "The man that came to your place while I was there...you know who I mean. I had never seen him before. If you prefer not to talk about him, I understand." The professor was quiet again.

"Yes, of course...my brother, Arnold. We have to talk about him. He is part of the story. Not the easiest to explain. In fact, very complicated, but..."

To be continued.



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Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose [Re: Don Osell] #7445 03/16/07 04:26 PM
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Part 30: July 3, 1936, continued--The office of Dr. Jacques Duclos:
Professor Heidelburg continued his story: "...My brother, Arnold, is a brilliant man...eccentric...others have even stronger words to describe him. He has a doctorate in psychology and is a licensed psychiatrist; in the Freudian school. He has written books and he lectures on telekinesis and extrasensory perception; out-of-body experiences, that kind of phenomenon. I tell you this not to confuse you but for you to understand his make-up." After a moment he continued: "I also tell you I love my brother but I do not agree with all of his beliefs. He is...very complicated, to put it simply.

"So...three days before Emily Rose became ill I was startled one afternoon when Arnold suddenly appeared at the door of our cabin.
I was certain he was still in Vienna but there he stood. How did you get here? I asked. 'I'm not sure I can tell you...and if I did, you probably wouldn't believe me.' I pressed him further and his expaination was, 'Somehow I was cosmically, bodily transferred across space. It has happened to me once before. I don't cause it to happen...I don't control it.' You are right, I told him, what you've said is preposterous, impossible! 'The other time it happened,' he went on, 'was during a time of crisis and it turns out I was there to help out. Why? I can't explain.'

"There are no problems here, Anold, so your theory, if that's what you're suggesting, doesn't hold up. We talked well into the evening and his presence there only became more confusing to me. Yet I could tell that Arnold was dead serious in his explanation. 'I have found a place to stay near here, the farm just over the hill. I can only wait now to see what, if anything, happens next.' We met and spent time together each day, but it was as though a dark cloud had come over my head.

"Then two days later Emily Rose became very ill. I knew about you, Dr. Duclos, and that you had a cabin on the river. I took a chance that you might be there that night, and you were." Duclos answered him, "You didn't go to your brother?" "No, frankly, I didn't fully believe his story, it was just...too... totally unbelievable. I'm a rational man, Doctor; she was ill, you are a medical man, so I came to you first.

"But later on, after you said told me Emily Rose wasn't responding, I thought back to Arnold's words, that he might have been transposed here to help out in some sort of crisis...and, well, when a loved-one is in trouble you grasp at anything that might help, no matter how unreasonable it might seem. That's when I went to get Arnold. Do you understand?"

The circle of listeners in Duclos office sat silently, totally at a loss for words. Under his breath Win Working thought, "Bizzare. Unreal. If I wrote a story on this no one would believe it! No editor would even print it!"

Heidelburg went on, "That is the story...of what happened that day out on Devil's Jump-Off on Rush River. I don't blame you if you find it unbelievable. I do think it's quite enough for one sitting. Maybe we should go out in the fresh air. Yes, a breath of fresh air would do us all good. After all, we are here in a beautiful town, on a wonderful day. Let's enjoy ourselves."

Next: Fourth of July and a performance by the Diva. To be continues...

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Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose [Re: Don Osell] #7452 03/17/07 03:43 PM
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Part 31--Fourth of July, 1936:
The Community Square was a beehive early on the morning of the Fourth. A truck from Lambert lumber yard arrived and unloaded a pile of framing lumber. A group of men headed up by Elmer Tolf and "Lank" Ehlers were preparing to build a platform in front of the bandstand. A tow-headed youngster came up to Tolf and asked, "What'cha buildin'?" "A stage," Elmer replied "...there's going to be a program here this afternoon."

"What kinda program?" the kid persisted. "Well, see that young lady over there...talking to band director, George Zukeswerth?" The boy nodded. "She's going to sing today...with the town band."
Curious, the tow-head edged over toward the pretty lady and the band director. As she turned to walk away the boy asked her, "Are you a famous person?" The lady laughed, "No, not at all. I'm just someone who likes to sing. Do you like music?" she asked. "Sure do," the boy replied, "We got a player-piano at home."

"How old are you?" the pretty lady asked the tow-headed boy. "Almost 8," he answered. "Would you and your friends like to sit up front? Right by the stage?" she asked him. "Could we?" he asked bug-eyed.

She was about to ask him his name but before she could get the words out the tow-headed kid raced off to tell his friends the news.

At the 3 o'clock that afternoon the Community Square was crowded with people. The band played a number of patriotic Sousa marches; Mayor Molitor read a special Independence Day proclamation. Then band director Zukeswerth stepped forward and announced there would be a special performance "from Diva Anna Karol...star of the Metropolitan Opera. Some of you know her just as Emily Rose," Zukeswerth said, "and she is here to perform for us this afternoon."

Anna/Emily Rose walked to front-center stage and the band struck up a medley of popular George Gershwin songs. When she sang Gershwin's "Lady be Good" she waved and winked at the kids in first row in front of the stage. The audience was totally capitvated by her voice and her persona. Watching from a spot in the back of the crowd Dr. Duclos thought to himself, "This is the same little girl I first saw that night out at Devil's Jump-Off...hard to believe." Anna and the Henderson band completed the program with a rousing rendition of "America the Beautiful."

It was a Fourth of July program that would be long remembered in Henderson.

Next: Preparing for departure and some curious footnotes to the "Strange Happening out at Devil's Jump-Off."


Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose [Re: Don Osell] #7470 03/19/07 02:11 PM
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Part 32--July 5. 1936:
The morning following the Fourth festivities: Doc Duclos was in his office, and as he enjoyed his morning cup of coffee he mentally went back over the events of the past few days. How good it was to see the Heidelburgs again and that both, father and daughter, were doing so well. The hours spent out at Devil's Jump-Off helped erase some of the mystery of what transpired out there eighteen years. "My God," Doc thought, "eighteen years. I can't believe it!" Still, the incident as it related to Heidelburg's brother, Arnold, only served to heighten the mystery. How could a person travel across a great distance and materialize in a different place? As a man of science and medicine Duclos was inclined to write it off as pure unadulterated fiction, but he knew that August Heidelburg was an educated man, a psychologist, and he, too, was completely baffled.

At just that moment Professor Heidelburg entered Duclos office. "We're staying next door, Doctor, and I thought you might be up." Taking a chair across from Duclos he continued, "We have had such a good time here. Thank you for making us feel so much at home. I did want to tell you more about the events as they pertain to my brother. I was very secretive about all that when I left here 'way back in 1918. The reason? You see I was a young professor then, trying to establish my credentials. My specialty is in applied psychology; how, if we better understand the world around us, we can make a better life." He paused to sip on the cup of coffee Duclos had set before him. "I was returning to a new teaching position at the university, and the last thing I wanted on my resume was an incident that appeared to border on the supernatural, the occult. So I figured the less said the better." Again he savored the stout coffee Duclos had brewed. "Today I am much more comfortable with the things I do not understand; I am not threatened by the paranormal.

"You might be iterested in knowing, doctor, that my brother, Arnold, is in Canada now--Montreal, to be specific--he is teaching at what I believe is your old university there. He does not teach so much now as he is in demand to speak and lecture around Canada and America." Duclos asked, "Is he still a proponent of apparitions, out-of-body experiences?" "Very much so," Heidelburg responded. "Especially reincarnation. But as I said the other day, he is my brother and we have a good relationship inspite of our differences."

[Later that day the Heidelburg party departed from the depot in East Henderson. In their company was the Minneapolis police detective, Bill Ayers. They stopped over in Minneapolis for several days where Professor Heidelburg spoke at a psychology seminar at the University of Minnesota.]

Next: The penultimate conclusion.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose [Re: Don Osell] #7481 03/20/07 02:42 PM
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Part 32:

Afterwords: Dr. Professor August Heidelburg continued teaching at Eastern New York State University until after World War II, after which he returned to Austria for a brief time. He eventually retired to a modest home in the Catskill Mountains. Emily Rose continued her singing career under the Anna Karol stage name. She appeared in many opera productions and both on- and off-Broadway shows.

[This article appeared in the Montreal Bulletin in March 1970: "Dr. Arnold Jacob Heidelburg, an academic psychistrist and author/lecturer on the paranormal, died on February 28. Dr. Heidelburg was internationally famous for his research into what is called the survival of personality after death; and out-of-body experiences. He wrote of at least one personal experience where his body was physically transposed from one location to another some distance away. He left behind an experiment that is being closely watched. Dr. Heidelburg bought and locked a cabinet with a secret combination word-code that known only to him. He said that if found himself able he would try and communicate that code in some way to someone in a vivid dream, or some other way, so the lock could be opened."]

[From the same Montreal newspaper in November, 2006: "The locked cabinet left behind in 1970 by Dr. Arnold Jacob Heidelburg upon his death remains firmly shut."]

Next: The final installment.

Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose [Re: Don Osell] #7501 03/21/07 02:59 PM
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Part 33:

We've reached the end if the story. I know, we said that onced before...in the first installment which ended in October of 2005. Some stories, however, have legs. This one did.

To repeat what we said back then: Most of the people in the story are real people I knew growing up in Henderson (even the tow-headed kid); the professor and his daughter are the exceptions: fabricated, purely fictional. The events never happpened (but we suppose they could have). Loretta and Minerva Herrmann, the central personalities in this second half of the story, grew up in Henderson, became teachers, and, I believe, lived most of their adult lives in the Chicago area. I recall the Independent carried occasional articles about them, often relating to their travels. As such, it was easy to cast them in this story and have them track around Europe in pursuit of the trail of the fictional "Emily Rose" and her father. If any reader of this story know more about the lives of the Herrmann sisters I would enjoy hearing from you.

Henderson in the 1930s and 40s was a great place for a kid to grow up. The real-life people woven into in this story are remembered with great fondness. We have always tried to portait them in a dignified way.
--30--


Re: More about What Happened to Emily Rose [Re: Don Osell] #7502 03/21/07 03:04 PM
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Don, THANKS for another GREAT story!! I was on the edge of my chair waiting and reading each new chapter/part!!
Can't wait for the next story to start!!
Lisa

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